Tribu Masai au Kenya. Cliquez pour agrandir


Bienvenue au 1928241 ème voyageur depuis Jan 04. Connectés :2
Retour de Sicile en Octobre 2007, les photos !!

Laguna Verde a la frontière chili-bolivie - Cliquez
Page des Nouveautés sur le site
Qui sommes nous?
Albums tour du monde et précédents voyages
Carnet de voyage
Infos pour le tour du Monde : Objectifs, Itinéraire, Budget, Billets d'Avion, Formalités, Assurances, Internet
Infos pour préparer un voyage : Equipement, Santée, En cas de Besoin, Garder contact, Visas, Sécurité, Santée
Bilan de notre tour du Monde, notre retour en france, Partage de notre experience des voyages
Iles Uros sur le lac Titicaca (pérou) - Cliquez
Invitation aux voyages - Infos générales sur la culture de différent pays
Accueil
Nos pays, sites, endroits préférés, Nos coups de coeur, les meilleurs moments et les piresCartes, plans, informations des parcs NationauxNotre récits de Week-end autour de NiceNotre retour du de voyage du Tour du Monde, Installation à Nice, premiers mois, Changement de personnalitésInternet, Ordinateurs : cybercafés pour garder contact, stockage des photos numériques, comment créer et mettre à jour son site Internet?Livre d'or - Ecrivez nous un mot!Budget par pays pendant un tour du MondeComment voyager dans le Monde, la meilleure façcon
Chercher dans le site

From: gang awa [david_s_mann@yahoo.com]
From: Wade Allsopp [wadeall@yahoo.co.uk]
Sent: mercredi 7 janvier 2004 15:55
To: RTWers@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [RTWers] phones
My take on the question is that it depends on how long you plan to be
in any one country.

As I understand it, if you take your phone with you and use it without
changing the sim card, you will alweays be charged international mobile
phone rates (And I think both people unfortunate enough to call you and
for incomming calls. This is a recipy for a very expensive phone bill
unless you just use it in emergeny cases. If you do want just an
emergency phone, then if you are using a gsm phone, the international
coverage ought to be pretty good. I think the international coverage
for the various standards used in ther US is less complete. (thus bi
and tri phones are useful (though expensive)

If you are staying fro a couple of months in a place and are somneone
who would use the phone alot, then it may be worth taking your phone
(again gsm would i think be the best bert) and buying a local sim card
for places where you plan to be around for a while. I would have
thought for 80% of travllers however its not worth the hassle, better
to rely ion public phones, phone cards and internet cafes.

Altrhough recharging is no more of anissue than say a digiatl camera,
its, one more piece of expensive kit to worry about loosing etc.

Wade


--- Justin Weeks <cexizgood@yahoo.com> wrote: > A good phone to get is
the Ericsson T28 world phone. It is a tri
> band
> GSM phone and with the extended battery is said to work for 25+ days
> on
> standby without a charge(I had a T38 with the standard battery and
> it
> lasted for 12 days no charge and minor talking). The phone is also
> very
> small.
>
> Justin
> Collonville Nicolas-rb941c wrote:
>
> > I had the same question...
> >
> >
> >
> > I work in mobile phones, and I know that reception is covered in
> most
> > of cities all around the world. I was even surprised to get
> coverage
> > in small cities as Rurrenabaque in Bolivia. So the reception should
> be
> > fine except in distant areas. Of course, in case you bring you
> mobile
> > phone for emergencies, this is above all this places where you are
> far
> > from everything that you will need the phone the most. In cities,
> you
> > can ask help more easily without mobile phone.
> >
> >
> >
> > About charging, the question is the same than for numeric camera. I
>
> > think this should not be difficult to find a power supply to charge
>
> > the phone.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > I am thinking to bring my mobile phone for my RTW trip not for
> > emergencies but to keep contact more easily with my family who is
> > getting more and more worried. Just sending an sms to tell them
> that
> > we are still alive :-) .
> >
> >
> >
> > Anyway, in case you decide to bring your phone with you, you have
> to
> > check the band it supports. In deed, the NW in different countries
> may
> > not be the same band. For instance, the band in US is 1900 (850)
> > although the band is 900/1800 in Europe. That why most of the phone
>
> > works only in either Europe or US but not in both. Some Mobile
> > constructors now develop quad band phones. These phones work in
> both
> > US and Europe.
> >
> > On request I can give you the list of countries in the world that
> > supports the European band (900/1800), and also the coverage map of
>
> > the 900/1800 band in asia S.E . (it is 175Ko zip file)
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Hope this helps
> >
> > Nicolas
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: jolegutko [mailto:joanna_legutko@jltgroup.com]
> > Sent: mercredi 7 janvier 2004 10:00
> > To: RTWers@yahoogroups.com
> > Subject: [RTWers] phones
> >
> >
> >
> > questions keep popping into my head...
> >
> > is there any point at all lugging a cellphone with you around the
> > world?
> >
> > i had this vague concept that it could be useful in emergencies. or
> > some other strange situations. but how likely is reception/charging
> > anyway? is it worth the bother?
> >
> > any opinions?
> >
> > thanks!
> >
> > jo
> >
> >

Un commentaire sur la page? Un conseil à donner? N'hésitez pas!
Envoyez moi un petit mot et je l'insérerai dans la page. Ou Signez le livre d'or !!!
Optionnel : Nom Email  

Last modified : December 16, 2005 18:37


Divers : Liens vers autres sites, Webmasters, échange de liens, FAQ, Nous écrire
- S'inscrire à la mailing liste